Strolling round Queen’s Park

My Monday walk this week is an exploration of a large local Victorian park right on the edge of the town centre, a park which I haven’t been to for over 40 years. I remember my parents taking me there when I was a child – with nothing but acres of green space, a duck pond and a rather rubbish playground tucked in the bottom corner I thought it was the most boring of all the local parks. Fast forward to 1977 and when I worked at the far side of town I would often walk home through the park although I didn’t take much notice of my surroundings and have never been there since, but with a grant of over Β£4 million from the Heritage Lottery Fund in 2009 the place has undergone several improvements over the last few years so on a recent lovely sunny morning I took the dogs and went to check it out.
Queen’s Park, an area of roughly 22 acres, was created on pasture land purchased from the Earl of Bradford, and lies on sloping ground just out of the town centre. Originally called Bolton Park it was opened in 1866 by the Earl of Bradford himself, then in 1897 it was renamed in honour of Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee. Features included an ornate bandstand surrounded by water and flower beds and with amphitheatre-style terraces for seating, a pavilion building, an ornamental fountain, a large paddling pool and the Chadwick Museum which opened in 1884. The bandstand and its lake, the pavilion and the fountain were all gone long before I was born, the paddling pool disappeared not long afterwards and the museum was demolished in 1957 after the exhibits were transferred to the new town centre museum in the main library building – maybe if these things had still been there when I was a child I would have found the park a lot more interesting than I did at the time.
The park does have a couple of claims to fame though – in 1969 outdoor scenes for the Bolton-based film Spring and Port Wine, starring James Mason, were shot there, and in August that same year a little-known singer named Freddie Mercury performed with a band called Ibex in front of 500 enthusiastic teenagers at the town’s first open-air rock concert. He formed his own band Queen the following year and went on to become a global superstar.
There are several minor entrances to the park and two main entrances, one being at the bottom end close to the town centre and the other at the top on the wide main road which eventually leads to Chorley. My stroll started from this top entrance and straight away I got my first few photos, then as I walked down the wide main path a squirrel ran across in front of me to the bottom of a tree, staying there just long enough for me to snatch a photo of him.
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Daffodil display near the entrance
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Names are listed on all four sides of this cenotaph
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A few yards along I came to the large circular formal sunken garden surrounded by trees, shrubs and bushes ; the flower beds were bare but I did see my first rhododendron shrub of the season in full flower. A little way along the path from there, and set in an elevated position, was an informal garden with modern seating and views over the lower end of the park and towards the town centre.
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The sunken garden
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Rhododendrons are my most favourite shrub
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The modern garden and seating area
A minor path on the right took me down through the trees to the largest of the two lakes inhabited by various ducks, swans, geese and seagulls, then another path took me back up the slope to a wide and pleasant terraced walk backed by shrubbery where a modern war memorial and three Grade ll listed life-size statues on tall plinths were set back among the greenery.
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The terraced walk
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John Fielding, mill worker, trade unionist and MP, statue erected in 1896
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Benjamin Disraeli, writer, MP and twice British Prime Minister, statue erected in 1887
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James Dorrian, popular and well-respected local doctor, statue erected in 1898
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Modern war memorial erected in 2015
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At the end of the terrace I walked down the grassy slope to a minor path with the aim of getting to the bottom end of the park and working my way round and back up to the top, however a signpost told me that Dobson Bridge was down a path on the left so I decided to go and have a look. Dobson Bridge was erected in 1878 to link the original park with a later extension (now playing fields) on the far side of the River Croal and was officially opened by B A Dobson, Chairman of the local Park Committee. Built of cast iron and on cast iron supports it has ornamental stone pillars at both ends, each with an ornate cast iron plaque featuring the town’s crest. Thinking back to my childhood I remember the bridge to be a grey not-very-nice-looking structure but having been restored and repainted in modern colours it now looks quite attractive.
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Dobson Bridge
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River Croal from the bridge
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Riverside walk
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The path passed the end of Dobson Bridge and a little way along was a small fishing lake backed by a bank of trees and another bridge, plainer this time, which led to a small development of modern business units across the river. There was a path on the far side of the fishing lake so I was able to walk all the way round before making my way back to the lower end of the park.
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The fishing lake
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The fishing lake and Dobson Bridge
The next path split into two so I took the lower one which headed in the direction of the playground in the bottom corner of the park, and Sophie being Sophie she found what must have been the only muddy patch in the whole park, though by the time we got to the playground the mess on her paws had disappeared. Not far from the playground a set of wide stone steps and a long path led back up to the terrace with the statues, and at the bottom of the steps was a fountain and a couple of benches.Β From the playground I took the path past the bottom main entrance and the modern cafe and followed it uphill towards the main road, with my last shot featuring the same as the first – daffodils.
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Look who found the muddy bit
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“Look mum, my paws are clean again now”
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The path to the terrace
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A very colourful play area
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Heading back to the main road
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Back at home I checked out the park on Google Maps satellite view and realised there were a few things I hadn’t yet seen. Maybe it was because I’d been looking at the park with fresh adult eyes or maybe the modern improvements had helped, but I’d found it a lot less boring than when I was a child, and having missed a few things this time I’ll certainly be returning later in the year for another exploration and dog walk.
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8 thoughts on “Strolling round Queen’s Park

  1. That’s a lovely park to visit. I do like your photo of the squirrel, they usually scarper up the trees far too quick to photograph them. I’m laughing at Sophie finding somewhere to paddle, she cares not that it’s mud πŸ™‚ It’s good to know that Lottery money is put to good use making the park a good place for town people to enjoy. Be good for you to return and see what you missed.

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    1. I was surprised that the squirrel stayed where it was for so long, maybe it saw the dogs and was deciding whether to run or freeze πŸ™‚ If there’s anywhere that’s messy you can always trust Sophie to find it πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚ I really enjoyed my walk round the park after not having been there for so many years – I’m hoping that next time I go the flower beds will be planted up and I can get some good colourful shots. Incidentally, I’ve just added a bit – now paragraph 3 – which you may find interesting πŸ™‚

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      1. We would enjoy watching that film, some good comic actors in it, Bernard Bresslaw, Rodney Bewes and Arthur Lowe. In fact Martyn thinks he’s seen it before but we’d would watch it again and to see your park obviously πŸ™‚ Interesting about Freddy Mercury playing there before he was famous too!

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        1. To be honest I don’t remember ever having seen that film unless it was on tv in the early 70s – I might just be tempted to look for it on dvd just to see the locations as there were other local ones as well as the park. And who knew that a local park would play host to someone who would later become such a famous singer πŸ™‚

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  2. Goodness, Bolton Tourism should have you on retainer – who knew there are so many lovely places to walk in your town? How lovely to get out in the sunshine. It’s gone back to being thoroughly gloomy and chilly today.

    Sophie does look quite lovely in her little bodywarmer πŸ™‚

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  3. It’s surprising how many people still think that this town has the ‘smoking chimneys, mills, cloth cap and clogs’ image but nothing could be further from the truth now as there are so many lovely open spaces around and about. Even though Queen’s Park is right on the edge of town and close to the university and 6th form college it’s a quiet and peaceful oasis and I’ll certainly go back later in the year.

    I don’t normally dress the dogs in stuff but they do have warm hoodies for when it’s really cold, and Sophie has been wearing a t-shirt/body warmer since she had her operation, though it will be coming off once the weather warms up properly πŸ™‚

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  4. Seeing things with adult eyes certainly changes the perspective. I was quite surprised at how nice the park actually is, and the modern refurbishments have certainly enhanced it. I’m looking forward to going back once the trees are in full leaf, it will look different again then πŸ™‚

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