Limerick street art

In my recent wanderings around Limerick, and just after I’d come out of the castle, I spotted a couple of small murals painted on the wall of an empty shop. Photographing street art wasn’t something I’d been thinking about on this particular occasion but these were quite sweet in an amateurish way so I snapped a couple of shots and thought no more about it. However not far from St. Mary’s church I saw another mural, a huge one painted on a gable end wall, so having seen that one I decided to see if I could find some more while on my perambulations around the city.
DSCF2436 - Copy
DSCF2437 - Copy
A shame someone scrawled a black mark on this one
The first large mural I saw was on the gable end wall of a house not far from St. Mary’s Church, with the second one on the side wall of an empty shop premises opposite the main entrance gates to the cathedral – I hadn’t noticed that one earlier as I’d been walking in the opposite direction. The main road past the cathedral gates took me into the town centre and quite by chance I found a large mural of geometric shapes on a wall down an alley off one of the side streets. Presumably whoever did it must have overloaded the paintbrush as there were paint runs down the wall in several places.
DSCF2531 - Copy
DSCF2532 - Copy
DSCF2535 - Copy
The next one I found covered the whole length of the side wall of a building off one of the main shopping streets. It wasn’t easy to tell at first but in among all the geometric shapes and pink splodges were actually two faces looking in opposite directions. I found the last mural just after I’d seen the Terry Wogan statue on Harvey’s Quay, it was on the door and shutter of a premises which didn’t seem to have a name.
DSCF2538 - Copy
DSCF2541 - Copy
DSCF2542 - Copy
DSCF2543 - Copy
DSCF2537 - Copy
Mural by Irish artist Maser and New Zealander Askew One
DSCF2555 - Copy
And so to the brightly painted cottages I’d seen from the far side of the river earlier in the day. Although from a distance they did look like proper cottages they were anything but – yes, they were cottages but they were derelict ones, last inhabited over 40 years ago and left to the elements since then. Back in 2014, as part of a Limerick regeneration programme, 15 volunteers from the King’s Island area where the cottages are situated stripped, cleaned and painted the cottage fronts over the course of a week. It would certainly have brightened up what had previously been an eyesore but now, five years later and obviously lacking attention, the cottages are looking a bit worse for wear – a shame really as they look quite attractive, especially from a distance.
DSCF2365 - Copy
DSCF2359 - Copy
DSCF2363 - Copy
DSCF2362 - Copy
DSCF2361 - Copy
DSCF2360 - Copy
DSCF2364 - Copy
So there you have it, just a few examples of Limerick’s street art found by chance on my day out in the city. I’ve no doubt there are probably several more murals dotted about the place so my mission now is to do a bit of research to see if I can find out the locations of any more – and hopefully a future visit to the city will produce some more street art photography.

19 thoughts on “Limerick street art

  1. Those particular examples of street art don’t really appeal to me and are not in the same league as street art you have photographed in Blackburn and Manchester and which I’ve also photographed in Manchester and in Glasgow. I really like the cottages though. The black mark on the second picture looks quite like a bird underneath the tree; an odd shape for just a random scrawl. Perhaps somebody decided to add their own contribution.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I thought too that the black mark looked a bit like a bird but if it is then it’s a bit of an odd place for someone to put it as it partially covers the dog and one of the kids, which really spoils the original picture. Since writing this post I’ve had a look on the internet and found nine or ten more really exceptional ones which will be well worth photographing, presuming of course they are still there the next time I go back.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. I’ve never been to Tobermory (I’d love to go) but I’ve seen pictures of the colourful cottages there. These cottages can’t be accessed from the front as there are railings all along – maybe being derelict they could be dangerous – and probably not from the back either as there’s a graveyard behind them, but next time I go there I’ll have a good go at trying to get in! πŸ™‚

      Like

  2. I like the painting on the roller shutter and the first two are quite naive. I’d describe the cottages as quaint πŸ™‚

    Like

  3. It’s everywhere these days, if you look for it, isn’t it? πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚ I’ve put your Day in Limerick in next Monday but you don’t need to link or visit if you don’t have the time. No problem πŸ™‚

    Like

  4. Thanks Jo, I did visit a couple of the ones in your post this week then got bogged down with writing more about Ireland. I’ve got some great street art shots taken in Dublin to come yet, including several electricity boxes πŸ™‚

    Like

  5. I really enjoy seeing street art. I really like that first one, a lovely scene, and the geometric shapes are very clever with the faces set behind them. I think the cottages look better from afar, the doors are a little gaudy, but better than just being left to fall into disrepair I suppose.

    Like

  6. Learning about the cottages makes me wonder why they haven’t been demolished long before now if they haven’t been lived in for over 40 years, but I think painting the fronts was a great way of brightening up a run-down corner. Maybe they’ve been left as a bit of a tourist attraction πŸ™‚

    Like

  7. Please know that I’m really enjoying your posts from Limerick and Dublin but I’m struggling to comment as my laptop doesn’t like WordPress for some reason. I will try to use my phone in future. X

    Like

    1. Comments from you are always appreciated whichever way you make them – it’s a shame your laptop doesn’t like WordPress, I can’t think what the problem would be.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s