Salford Museum and Peel Park

Salford Museum & Art Gallery started life as Lark Hill Mansion, built in 1809 by Colonel James Ackers and situated in extensive grounds. After 40 years as a private house Salford City Council purchased the building to be used as an educational site, planning to turn it into a public museum and library, and in 1849 Mr John Plant was appointed museum curator and librarian. The building opened as the Royal Museum and Public Library in April 1850, the first free public library in England, and after less than five months was attracting an average of 1,240 visitors per day; extensive refreshment rooms were then opened on the basement floor and two adjoining rooms were added to the library, allowing it to accommodate nearly 12,000 books.
In 1851 three of the East rooms in the museum were knocked into one with proposals to turn the space into an art gallery, then in 1852 a large extension was added to the back of the building, creating a reading room on the ground floor and a museum room above. Between 1854 and 1856 the North and South galleries were opened along with a lending library of 2,500 books, and by 1857 visitor numbers had risen to an average of 3,508 per day. On his death in 1874 Edward Langworthy, a local business man, former Mayor of Salford and an early supporter of the museum, left a £10,000 bequest to the museum and library and this was used to build the Langworthy wing which connected the north and south wings; it was finished in 1878 and officially opened in August that year.
Fast forward almost sixty years and by 1936 the fabric of the original building, the former Lark Hill Mansion, was found to be structurally unstable so it was demolished and replaced by a new wing to match the Langworthy wing. It took two years to complete and was opened in 1938, then in 1957 part of the ground floor of the new wing was turned into Lark Hill Place, a reconstructed Victorian street named after the original Lark Hill Mansion. Although the museum originally had a wide remit when it came to collecting artefacts from different parts of the world it now focuses on social history with a Victorian gallery and hundreds of Victorian objects on display in Lark Hill Place.
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The main entrance to the museum took me through a foyer and into a large and bright reception space with a shop area and a pleasant café beyond it, and on the right was the local history library and a magnificent staircase leading up to the galleries above. After looking round Lark Hill Place, which was my main reason for going to the museum, I went to have a look upstairs; unfortunately a couple of the galleries were closed while the various collections and displays were updated but I had a pleasant wander round the Victorian Gallery, and though I’ve never really liked Victorian paintings I did like the sculptures and the various objects on display.

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In an octagonal glass cabinet was the orrery, a mechanical model of the solar system named after the fourth Earl of Orrery, and though the first one was made for him around 1713 the one on display dates from the early 20th century. Unfortunately I couldn’t get any really clear shots of it as there were reflections and things in the background on all sides, also I was careful to obey the instruction of ”please do not lean on the glass”
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A section of the fabulous ceiling
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In another gallery was the Superlative Artistry of Japan exhibition, a range of works including paintings and ceramics and several contemporary pieces representing food samples. In the middle of the floor was a wire mesh waste basket crammed full of empty cans – it seemed a strange place for visitors to discard their rubbish but it was actually part of the exhibition.

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Sashimi Boat food sample in vinyl chloride resin, courtesy of Maiduru Co. Ltd

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By the wall in a partially closed gallery was a glass case exhibiting a huge fish, a tarpon caught in the West Indies. There was no date on it, possibly due to some of the exhibits being moved and updated, but the Royal Mail Steam Packet Company operated between 1839 and 1932 so the fish would have been caught sometime during those 93 years.
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The museum building is situated on the edge of Peel Park which was once the extensive grounds of Lark Hill Mansion, so after coffee and cake in the very pleasant café I went to look round the park itself. Following a 7-year campaign by Sir Robert Peel and Mark Phillips MP for a public park it was agreed that part of the Lark Hill estate should be used, and after winning a design competition in 1845 Joshua Major & Son laid out the park. Paid for by public subscription it was the first of three Manchester and Salford parks to be opened to the public in 1846. In 1851 the park was the main public venue for the royal visit of Queen Victoria to Manchester and Salford, a visit which was attended by 80,000 people; in 1857 a statue of the Queen was erected in the park then in 1861 a statue of the Prince Consort was erected after his death.
The peak of the park’s popularity came in the 1890s; by then there was a lake, a fountain, a bandstand, a bowling green and cricket pitch, a skittle alley, seating areas and pavilions. It was the place to see and be seen but years later, in the aftermath of both world wars, many people moved away from the area and the park was no longer the focal point of a community. In the years between 1954 and 1967 it underwent a major redevelopment and landscaping then in 1981 it became part of The Crescent conservation area. Unfortunately the park fell into disrepair in the last few years of the 20th century but after receiving a grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund in 2016 it underwent a second redevelopment and reopened in 2017.

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Some very early blooms in a sunny corner
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The River Irwell and some of its residents
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Unfortunately I didn’t get to explore the park as much as I would have liked; although the sun was still shining the blue sky of earlier had been replaced by clouds which were getting darker by the minute so not wanting to get caught in a downpour I cut my visit short and made my way back to the station a couple of minutes walk away. It proved to be a good move as I was just crossing the road near the station entrance when I was hit by a heavy shower of hailstones. I didn’t mind too much though, I’d had my few hours out and got plenty of photos, and now having recently seen photos of the park in full bloom I’ll certainly be going back later in the year when the leaves are on the trees and the weather’s good.

 

13 thoughts on “Salford Museum and Peel Park

  1. Fascinating place. My daughter-in-law would really like the Japan Exhibition. That waste basket full of cans is an unbelievable example of what passes as art these days. The park will look wonderful in the summer months, certainly worth you revisiting.

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  2. I’m of the same opinion when it comes to modern ‘art’. When I realised that the waste basket was an exhibit I was very tempted to go and buy a can from the café, drink the contents then add the can to the pile – I wonder if anyone would have noticed? 🙂 🙂 I did actually pick up one of the cans, it was weighted with cement inside so presumably they were all like that. I wonder how much thinking and creativity went into that one??

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    1. I thought you might like the orrery, it’s a shame I couldn’t get better photos but I would have had to lean on the glass and I didn’t want to risk it – maybe next time…

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  3. That gallery and ceiling are fabulous, Eunice, but it seemed awfully crowded to me. I was glad when you took me out in the fresh air. What’s a bit of rain? Ha- that’s easy to say! It’s poured here all afternoon. Reflecting people’s mood, I think. Hope you’re taking good care. 🙂 🙂

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  4. I was lucky that I got the Victorian street and the galleries to myself – I went on a weekday, if I’d gone the previous weekend or the week before when schools were on holiday the place really would have been crowded 😦 Life goes on as normal here for me, I hope you’re okay over there x

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  5. On catch up at the moment, so a little late with reading, but what a lovely day out. Thanks for all the info & great photos. The ceiling is amazing, as were the storm clouds building in the distance. I kept thinking as I scrolled down, that you were going to say you’d been soaked & had to find shelter. Take care & stay safe.

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  6. I was close to the station entrance when the hailstone shower hit so I was soon able to get out of it. I had a lovely few hours out – the coffee and cake were good too – and I’m really looking forward to going back in late spring/early summer to get some better photos of the park 🙂

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  7. What a lot of changes that building has seen, but it looks very impressive, that ceiling is very grand. It looks like there’s plenty to see, I like the model of the solar system, not too sure about the fish or the basket of rubbish.

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    1. The basket of discarded cans made me smile – it wouldn’t take much effort to put that lot together yet it’s called art?? The ceiling in the Victorian gallery is fabulous, the design and colours are wonderful 🙂

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  8. The museum building is beautiful and the park definitely looks worthy of a return visit. It will be interesting to see how it looks at a different time of year. X

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  9. The far end of the museum building is exactly the same as in the photo but there were cars parked there so I purposely didn’t take a full length shot. The park was really nice, and set alongside the river it’ll be great for a dog walk so I’m really looking forward to going back another time 🙂

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