A local walk at Easter

Staying away from Manchester street art for a while, my Monday walk this week is just a local one which takes me not too far from home and which I featured on here a couple of years ago. Along the back lane close to home I came across a large patch of tiny yellow flowers spreading across the grass verge; I don’t know what they are, they may even be weeds but they looked pretty enough for a quick photo.
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The bottom of the lane emerges onto a busy main road and over on the far side is a large and pleasant triangle of green space. Bounded by the main road on one side and by minor roads with big houses on the other two sides it’s not big enough to be called a park but with a couple of benches it’s a nice enough place to sit and while away some time on a sunny day.
At the apex of the triangle a local community group had put up three Easter displays while further along all the larger trees had been decorated with colourful ribbons and there was a childrens’ Easter egg hunt taking place A couple of large white ‘Easter bunnies’ were overseeing the proceedings and a ‘find’ of a painted stone, plastic duck, rabbit or egg could be exchanged for a chick or a rabbit containing a creme egg.
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Following the longest of the minor roads took me to a steep cobbled lane with an even steeper bank on one side, and down at the bottom of the lane was the bridge over Eagley Brook. At the far side of the bridge was Brook Mill, a former cotton mill converted into apartments in 2003, and down in the water was a small group of residents ducks, among them the large black and green Cayuga duck which I’d first seen two years ago. Not having seen him last year it was nice to know that he’s still around.
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A short access road behind Brook Mill took me to a footpath and a distance along was the very overgrown mill pond with its current residents, two mallards and a white duck which seemed to be all on its own. The footpath emerged onto the large expanse of open land belonging to a local sports club and I found that since I went that way last year the land had been separated from the path by high green metal fencing with a proper entrance and access track running between the football and cricket pitches. There was a game of football taking place, presumably between two local amateur teams, but as I have no interest in sport I only stayed long enough to snap a couple of photos.
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A cobbled lane at the far side of the sports ground ran alongside the river and took me back onto the main road where a tarmac lane across the far side led me to a farm track through a wooded area, which in turn took me to a fishing lake and a huge field which was part of a vast expanse of farm land. A gravel footpath close to one side of the lake ran along the edge of the field and up to the main road which eventually runs past the end of my street.
As I got further along the path I came across three teenage lads sitting in the grass and shouting up to a fourth lad who was climbing up a nearby tree. I watched for a couple of minutes as he got higher and higher on some very narrow branches, then decided that I really didn’t want to witness what could possibly be a nasty accident if he put a foot wrong and a branch gave way; you can just see him on the left in the bottom two of the following four photos.
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Leaving the lads behind I continued up the path towards the road and a couple of minutes later was met by a large red tractor and trailer trundling down the hill. I didn’t fancy stepping off the path to get out of its way as the grass along the edges had been churned up, presumably by said tractor, but I needn’t have worried as it went round me. As it neared the bottom of the path it turned off into the field and began muck spreading, and though I couldn’t actually smell anything I was glad I wasn’t still down there.
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At the top of the hill I turned and snapped a photo of the view then set off down the main road. On the bank between the fields and the road a single clump of daffodils nodded their heads in the breeze and bordering the top corner of the end field were three trees bearing what seemed to be silvery white blossom.
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Ten minutes later I was back home and ready for a mid afternoon coffee. Not being a gardener I haven’t a clue what the silvery white trees were but they did make a nice photo to end what had been a very pleasant Easter walk with Snowy and Poppie.

18 thoughts on “A local walk at Easter

  1. Nice to see the activities going on for children although what can you say about the lad up the tree except that boys will be boys. It looked like a beautiful day and a very pleasant walk.

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    1. Well I’ve not heard or read any local news reports about a lad falling out of a tree and being injured so I guess he must have got back down okay. Weather-wise it was a lovely day and it was a nice walk without going too far.

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  2. Morning lovely, your personal horticultural consultant checking in . . . the plants with pretty yellow flowers are Lesser Celandine.

    Native, very important at this time of year for bees. Lots of people dislike it because it can be a pest/thug and spreads very easily but like (nearly) all native plants it is important. I’ll come back later and enjoy the rest of your pics.

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  3. I love the view at the top of your walk! I see your friend Jayne has already identified the celandine for you πŸ™‚ Could the trees in your last photo be blackthorns? Their blossom is coming out about now and is very striking because the branches are still bare.

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  4. That view is just ten minutes walk from home, it’s a view I see regularly but I never get tired of it. The moorland and fields continue off the left of the photo, bisected only by the road leading down towards home. I’m not sure about the trees, I’ll need to have a closer look next time I’m up there πŸ™‚

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  5. I assume you mean the small ones at the bunny house, not the large human ones πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚ I rather liked the bunny house display, it was very sweet πŸ™‚

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  6. Another lovely walk and how wonderful for you to have this beautiful area so close to home. They are muck spreading regularly here at the moment and I CAN smell it. Although it’s funny how you become used to it after a while πŸ™‚

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    1. You’re right about getting used to smells. When I worked at stables I would often smell of haylage if it was particularly strong stuff – I could never smell it on myself but other people could πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚

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  7. Fields around here are ‘muck spread’ every year (so much preferable to clouds of chemical fertiliser) and I have to admit I love the smell, even on days when it is particularly pongy!

    To me it is natural, real (well, as real as any managed farming can be) and much better than the smell of vehicles, takeaway shops and goodness knows what else that is probably considered normal in towns & cities 😊

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  8. I have to agree with you on that one Jayne. I actually don’t mind a muck spreading smell as long as I’m not too close to it – ‘good country smells’ as my ex used to say, but then he would, he was a farm lad πŸ™‚

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  9. Celandines are the sunshiney coloured flowers, my blog is named after them. And yep, the blossom is most probably Blackthorn, the flowers appear before the leaves. X

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  10. I don’t know why but I always thought celandines were a paler yellow than that. If those white trees ARE blackthorn then the blossom hasn’t lasted very long – I passed there today on my way back from Belmont and noticed there’s only the tree on the left which is still white, the others have gone a horrible discoloured brown 😦

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  11. What a lovely walk you have close to home, and lots of interesting things to see as you pass by. We had a wood near where I lived as a child, we all used to climb the trees and I remember a young lad who lived in my street falling out of one of them and breaking both his arms. It’s a wonder we didn’t get more injuries from falling out of trees the time we spent up them.

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